Leonardo da Vinci was a man of many interests. Some of these included invention, painting, mathematics and geology. The Renaissance period was a breeding ground for creative, diverse thoughts and experiences, and da Vinci was a man who explored differences in ideas and cultures.

Soren Trampedach, Founder and Chairman of Work Club Global

This philosophy is what Soren Trampedach, Founder and Chairman of Work Club Global, wanted to introduce to the working world. “I have a diversity philosophy, which essentially came from da Vinci. The disruption we see in all industries today is creating a lot of questions,” he says.

“And where better to find answers to some of those questions and broaden your perspective than by stepping out of your little industry, network or tribe? The core idea behind Work Club Global was to represent many different kinds of industries.”

Work Club Global is a collection of boutique office spaces for the modern professional that Soren founded in 2013. “Back then, everyone thought I was crazy,” he says. “I was financing the whole thing myself, and it wasn’t as common as it is today.”

It started with one space opposite the Supreme Court in Sydney. Although it could have been filled with barristers and lawyers, Soren wanted to open a space that facilitated encounters and conversations between people from multiple disciplines. “If we don’t achieve these things, we would be a space just like anywhere else,” he explains. “But we have created something special, something magical.”

Soren says the demand for flexible working space is ever increasing and comes from companies of all sizes. “Many of the top 200 companies in Australia are looking at how to move part of their portfolio to flexible real estate,” he notes.

“And once companies start using Work Club Global, they stay with us. They stay with us because of what we offer. It’s not just a space but a community and place for people to belong.”

“It’s not just a space but a community and place for people to belong.”

The market is shifting significantly. Research shows that up to 30% of corporate real estate portfolios could be co-working or flexible in the next decade. Work Club Global provides a hospitable space that encourages conversations and creates an experience for every individual who enters its building.

“To retain tenants, we need to focus on every single tenant, not just those in an executive suite,” Soren says. “We create an interesting and varied experience for them to come into every day.”

Soren admits, however, that leading his own business brings a multitude of worries, specifically about creating a long-term, sustainable business that continues to evolve. Bringing new experiences to clients means the company must be willing to change, but in a cynical society, it can be tough.

“We need to make sure we’re not standing still and don’t become just one of the crowd,” he explains. “I want to continue to lead and drive progressive new ideas. Dealing with some cynical visions of the world can be difficult, and if you listen to them it leads to no change.

“I want to continue to lead and drive progressive new ideas.”

“But the world is changing, whether we like it or not. Sometimes people are resistant to change. But it should be embraced, and we are leading that change rather than ignoring it.”

Soren loves what he does; he isn’t motivated by money or status. Instead, he truly believes in the power of connection. “Whether it’s a roomful of CEOs where I facilitate a roundtable or simply interacting with ordinary members, I enjoy seeing real connections between real people,” he says.

“We’re proud of what we’re doing here. We may not be saving the world, but we are trying to get people away from their usual crowd and helping them have open conversations with others. When we succeed in doing that, it’s powerful.”